author of the month- preethi venugopala

Preethi Venugopala, a civil engineer turned blogger, painter and story teller, is our author of the month.

15672708_1892873664277839_4485272521663554025_nHailing from the God’s own country, Kerala, she is at present settled in the Garden City, Bangalore. Starting her writing journey as a blogger, she had her first book, a novel titled ‘Without You’ published in 2015. Both common readers and the critiques have spoken very highly of the book as can be sensed from the Goodreads and Amazon pages.  To know more about her and her work visit the about page in her official website – A Writer’s Oasis. 

‘One Life is not Enough’ caught up with her for a chat session.

Q:   How smooth was the transition from Civil Engineering to authoring novels?

A:   Thank you, Durga Prasad, for inviting me. It is a pleasure to be featured on your blog.

      I took a sabbatical from my job after the birth of my son. I used to journal regularly. It was my husband to whom I had shown a particular journal entry who asked me to consider writing as a career. I had won story writing competitions while in college but had not pursued it further. When my son started playschool, I began to get free hours during the day and I started blogging. Blogging made the transition to becoming an author smooth and easy. In fact, if hadn’t started blogging, I might not have become a writer.

Q:   When did you discover you could paint as well? Or, was it your first love?

A:   I used to draw and paint while in school but had stopped once I left school. Then in 2011, my father passed away and I went into a mild depression. It was during that phase that I took up painting. It healed me from within. I still turn to painting and portraiture whenever I need a bit of cheering up.

513gnBokyRL._SY346_Q:   How do you effectively juggle various roles – as a mom, blogger, story teller, artist and other roles?

A:   It just happens naturally. Women are, after all, experts at multi-tasking. Yet, on most days I am just a mom. I give myself a few dedicated hours every day to be a blogger, writer or artist according to the mood of the day.

Q:   It is nice to see you continue to blog regularly even after becoming a published author. What role does blogging play in your overall creative journey?

A:   Blogging has played a significant role in my creative journey, especially my writing journey.

     As I said, I might not have become a writer if I was not a blogger. It was through blogging that I got acquainted with many other writers and publishers. My first publishing opportunity came via a pan India writing contest which was declared on the blog of author Bhavya Kaushik. I participated in the contest and got selected to be published.

    The first readers and reviewers of my debut novel were my blogger friends.

I also display my art work on my blog.

25656023Q:   Tell us about your first book and how did it come about?

A:   The idea of my first book came when I heard about the Mangalore plane crash on May 22, 2010. I was disturbed by the tragedy as it was the same route that I used to travel while I was working with the Dubai Metro. There were so many miraculous escape stories that filled the newspapers right after the tragedy. The many what if questions that troubled me then led me to write the book.

Q:   What was the inspiration behind your compiling a Malayalam alphabet book for kids? Do you think regional languages in India are in danger of being side-lined?

A:   The book was born out of a request made by my son. We live away from Kerala and hence it was difficult for us to get hold of study materials to teach him Malayalam. He 51UfCkLZ9pL._SY346_learned the basics but wanted my help to read the words. He told me to write down the pronunciation of the letters in English so that he could read it easily on his own. I created a PowerPoint presentation for his sake and then thought why not make an eBook that would be available for anyone who might need it.

No, I don’t think regional languages are being side-lined. Regional languages have survived for centuries. Our mother tongues bind us to our roots. Of course, because of migration, the new generation might learn a different language than the one their parents speak. It is something that cannot be helped. Parents can help the kids to get in touch with their roots by teaching them their mother tongue. That is the only way.

Q:   Is there anything else that you would like to say to our readers?

A:   Thank you for all the love that you have given me over the years. Do continue to shower your love on me.

Do check out her books if you haven’t read them yet:

Books by Preethi Venugopala on Amazon

Books by Preethi Venugopala on Juggernaut

Visit her blog: A Writer’s Oasis

Follow her on Social Media:

Twitter: @preethivenu

Instagram: @preethivenu

Facebook Page: Preethi Venugopala

 

 

my author of the august month

Purba Chakraborty needs no introduction to the avid readers and fellow bloggers in Indian blogosphere. So, when I decided to feature her as the author of the month, I wanted her to reveal certain aspects that she had not shared with her readers till now.

I am amazed by her versatility at such a young age. She blogs, she sings and till now, she has authored one book of poetry and three novels. In addition her poems and short stories have been part of a number of published anthologies. Her third novel –  Canvas of a Mind – has been out recently.

It is seen from her Amazon and Goodreads pages that her earlier books have made their marks on the readers’ minds. I am sure, ‘Canvass of a Mind‘ too will captivate the minds of the readers.

Here is my e-conversation with the author:

Q. You are involved in quite a number of creative activities – Blogging, Book Review, Singing, Books…. How do you juggle among them? I mean in a planned way or, you just surrender yourself to the mood of the moment. 

heart listens to no one.jpgA: I don’t have to juggle with them. I cannot survive without creativity. Therefore, I do all these activities out of love. I feel blessed to be able to express myself in various ways through creativity. But my priority will always be to write novels, short stories and poems.

Q. Coincidentally, August is the Birth month of Purba, the author. (This fact, I discovered after I had decided to feature you as the author of this month). Are you as enthusiastic a writer aftet your fourth book, as you were when your first book was released in 2012?

A: Yes, August is a very special month for me as my first book was released on 25th August, 2012. Yes, every time my book releases, I am excited, thrilled, nervous and emotional. The feeling never changes because a lot of hard work goes into the book. Unless you are a very famous author, the struggle of getting a publisher who will fund your book remains. So finally, when the book gets published and you see your words in print, it makes you feel surreal.

hidden lettersQ. Tell about a quirky incident in your childhood that you haven’t shared with your readers.

A: When I was ten, I wrote about 20 poems on a few loose sheets of paper and stapled them. On the first page, I did a doodle and wrote with sketch pen “Poetry book by Purba”. I still have that stapled copy. Every time I see it, I know that I am doing something right in my life. The ten year old Purba wanted to write books, though she was not completely aware of it.

Q. Apart from your family, who have been great sources of support in your writing journey?

A:  There have been so many people who have supported me in my writing journey at various phases of my life. I think everyone who has read my book and left a positive review or took the pain of writing an email to me, let me know his/her thoughts about my writing have helped me grow as a writer. My best friend, Priyam is the first reader of my books. She reads the first draft of the books and the way she encourages me makes me feel I am blessed. She is the one who helps me believe in myself and my writing, when I am having bad days.

Q. How do you cope with the obstacles you face? Life in general and writing activities in particular?

love and destinyA:  The year 2017 has been harsh on me. I lost my beloved grandmother in April. She was with me during the making of “Canvas of a Mind” (also when I was writing the acknowledgment). Losing her has left such an irreparable void in my heart that I find it difficult to go through my work and chores on some days.

There are times when I feel I can’t push myself to sit for work. I feel like breaking down. But I didn’t let my work get hampered and ensured that my book releases on time.

I think my personal motto “I rise after every fall” helps me get back on my feet in the morning even if I have cried the entire night. Meditation and yoga help me to calm my mind and take a bird’s eye view of things. The only way I cope with the obstacles I face is by not giving up, come what may. I keep marching forward even if I have wounded feet.

canvas of a mindQ. You have written one poetry book and three novels. Planning for any other genre?

A: I would want to write a memoir or non-fiction, someday. Right now, I am happy writing poetry and novels.

Q. Any other thing that you would like to share with our readers?

A:  My latest novel, “Canvas of a Mind” is a psychological mystery novel set against the back drop of Kalimpong, a remote hill station. It tells the story of two sisters whose lives change when a mysterious stranger starts stalking the younger sister. If you enjoy reading mysteries and thrillers with a touch of psychological drama, “Canvas of a Mind” will surely appeal to you. I hope you enjoy reading it.

Purba Chakraborty is a novelist, poet, web content developer, lifestyle blogger and social influencer from Kolkata. She has authored two novels “Walking in the streets of love and destiny”, “The Hidden Letters” and a poetry book “The Heart Listens to No One”. “Canvas of a Mind” is her third novel. Her short stories and poems have been published in more than ten anthologies and various magazines. She is a restless dreamer and wishes to write till her last breath.

She blogs regularly at Love, Laugh and Reflect (www.purba-chakraborty.com)

She can be reached at:

Facebook: writerpurbachakraborty

Twitter: @Manchali_Purba

Instagram: purba_chakraborty

email: purba.khushi@gmail.com

Sunday Musings and Random Notes #3


Indian Bloggers

Come on India, do not lose your sense of humour

A good sense of humour is vital for democracy, especially for its citizens. At least, it lets you live through all the broken promises made by your politicians.

It seems India is turning into a country of no dissent and no humour. There are some political and religious leaders who themselves act as jokers. But all hell breaks lose when some one makes a joke at their expense. It is unfortunate that the painter turned  CM of a state that takes pride in its hoary history of great intellectuals and artists cannot take dissent and humour in right democratic spirit. Down south, a Chief Minister who herself was an accomplished actress cannot digest a few songs written to criticize her. Recently, the backlash received by Justice Katju over his humorous Facebook Posts is unprecedented. I was reading one of the counter Facebook posts written by an Odiya politician, who has questioned Justice Katju’s authenticity of birth, education career and what not. As if by writing this one humorous post, Justice Katju lost all his democratic rights to be an honourable citizen of this great country where we have more statues and more cities and streets named after political and religions leaders than those named after writers and artists.

In India, it is somewhat OK to slight your nation. But, God forbid, you give a perceived sense of slighting to someone’s regional, religious or language identity. I wonder how the the great humorist Khushwant Singh would have reacted to the news that some one has filed a petition in Supreme Court to stop Santa Banta Jokes.

In this connection, all politicians have much to learn from the likes of Nehru,  Manmohan, Rahul Gandhi and Arvind Kejriwal. Nehru not only encouraged criticism of his works, it is also rumoured that he himself wrote articles criticizing himself and published the articles anonymously. We have  had unprecedented number of jokes floating online and offline about the other three. Imagine how much less humorous the world would be if these guys suddenly decided to file defamation cases.

Come on India. The drama enacted in your parliaments, ashrams, streets and offices are already full of so much humor. Just recognize, enjoy and have the last laugh. Leave all the serious business to your religious and political leaders.

jat joke.jpg

Celebrating thirty years of Malgudi Days

It is a humongous task for any director to convert a novel into a movie retaining its authenticity. It becomes all the more difficult when the story is humorous. In my young adult days I used to be a  great fan of RK Narayan. I still am. Malgudi Days, directed and produced by Shankar Nag did full justice to the characterization of the denizens of the fictional town Malgudi. Rarely did I miss an episode when it was first telecast on Doordarshan. Sometimes while random channel surfing I come across an episode of Malgudi Days on DD. It is as delightful to watch it today as it was three decades back.

As I have mentioned earlier in this post, in our country, we have more memorials built for religious and political leaders than writers and artists. If you go to a country like England or Canada, a famous writer’s erstwhile residence is marked as a must visit place for tourists to that city. But not here in India. How many of the present generation who visit Mysore would know that RK Narayan was a resident of that city. Of course after much hue and cry, the dilapidated house of RK Narayan was restored a couple of years back and now it functions as a memorial. Still, does it feature in the top ten, or, top twenty five places to see in Mysore?

malgudidays.jpgimage credit: thebetterindia.com